DDA Seat for Access and Inclusion is Extremely Good for Business

Disability is common in Australia, but often invisible. Nearly 10 per cent of the workforce has some form of disability, with 32 per cent of employees with disability working as professionals or managers.

As many as 1 in 5 Australians experience mental illness in any year, and 45 percent experience mental illness in their lifetime’.

The rate of disability increases with age. Nearly 40 per cent of the Australian workforce is aged 45 or over, which means that your most experienced and skilled employees may be impacted at some point. So it makes sense for employers to be accessible and inclusive to people with disability to ensure that they can hire the best person for the job and retain their skilled and experienced employees who may acquire disability.

Who knows what great ideas could be lost because people see this [a wheelchair], this [a white cane], or this [a hearing aid], before this [skills and qualifications]

‘A business that reflects the diversity of the community it serves, gains the loyalty and trust of both its customers and employees, as well as enhancing its reputation’.

And by making the recruitment process accessible and inclusive of people with disability, organisations have access to a wider talent pool of people with the right skills, qualifications, and experience.

What’s more, when you build your business to be inclusive, you’re making it safer, minimising injuries, avoiding breaching discrimination law, and improving access for everyone.

Disability confident businesses benefit from new talent, new ideas, new opportunities. Access and inclusion is good for business.
Check out this access and inclusion video as well https://vimeo.com/161720984

For more information, visit and.org.au.

Article by Australian Network on Disability featured on Vimeo.
Video produced by Video Spartan.

More News

Safer, Hands-free Waste Management

In the current state of the world, cleanliness – including upholding high standards of hygiene and reducing the risk of infection – is at the forefront of government strategy and operation.

Read More

New Tech Offers Clearer, Easier-to-read Ads

New opaque signs with a semi-transparent viewing strip make shelter advertising easier to read without compromising on bus stop patron visibility.

Read More

Waste Innovation Comes to Casey

Sustainability technology companies Matter and yStop are pleased to announce the signing of a commercial contract with the City of Casey in Victoria.

The contract will give the City of Casey real-time data and software as well as Australia’s most advanced waste system that will help improve waste collection efficiencies, lower costs and reduce litter across key public spaces.

Read More

Amazing Research Outcome from Mohamed Ali’s PhD Project

Mohamed Ali completed 2 years of foundational research with Murdoch University.

He is now based in Melbourne and works for yStop together  with Dr Giles Oatley from Federation University. Both Dr Giles Oatley and Mohamed are available for all research and development work that the City of Casey would like to undertake. Mohamed’s area of study relates to smart cities with particular expertise in co-located crowd measurement/waste sensor configurations.

Read More

The Latest What3words Developments

There are two new exciting tech developments that have just been released through what3words, the navigation technology that we use to locate our street furniture.

Read More

What3words is Buzzing

Look what has just been featured on QI over the weekend, it’s what3words the system we are currently using to map our smart furniture locations.

Read More